en-en

Cunning

adverb

1) Knowing; skillful; dexterous.

2) Wrought with, or exhibiting, skill or ingenuity; ingenious; curious; as, cunning work.

3) Crafty; sly; artful; designing; deceitful.

4) Pretty or pleasing; as, a cunning little boy.

5) Knowledge; art; skill; dexterity.

6) The faculty or act of using stratagem to accomplish a purpose; fraudulent skill or dexterity; deceit; craft.

Example Sentences for

Cunning

1) That which inspires respect in woman, and often enough fear also, is her NATURE, which is more naturalsthan that of man, her genuine, carnivoralike, Cunning flexibility, her tiger-claws beneath the glove, her NAIVETE in egoism, her untrainableness and innate wildness, the incomprehensibleness, extent, and deviation of her desires and virtues.
2) I say by me—I see that your Cunning associate suppressed my name, although for ought he knew, it would be quite strange to your ears.
3) My mother found it, after a year of Cunning search—ay, and found the child.’ ‘She took it, did she?’ ‘No.
4) His eyes, twinkling with Cunning enjoyment, glanced at every moment towards his companion’s face.
5) He was on his way, somewhere on this lonely road, and presently he would join them; then the well-laid trap would close, two dozen men, led by one whose hatred was as deadly as his Cunning was malicious, would close round the small band of fugitives, and their daring leader.
6) Evidently the slumberer, deep in dreamless sleep, would not interfere with Chauvelin’s trap for catching that Cunning Scarlet Pimpernel.
7) He dismissed him within some quarter of a mile of Mr Sikes’s residence, and performed the short remainder of the distance, on foot. ‘Now,smuttered the Jew, as he knocked at the door, if there is any deep play here, I shall have it out of you, my girl, Cunning as you are.’
8) Where­ 16 SOCIAL PROTEST as Innocence, having no such Purpose, walks fearlessly and care­ lessly through Life; and is consequently liable to tread on the Gins, which Cunning hath laid to entrap it. . . . it is not Want of Sense, but Want of Suspicion by which Innocence is often betrayed. . . . many an innocent Person hath owed his Ruin to this Circumstance alone, that the Degree of Villainy was such as must have exceeded the Faith of every Man who was not himself a Villain.7 That Fielding largely avoids satire in Amelia makes his criticism relatively straightforward, without a stylistic intermediary be­ tween the author's voice and the reader.
9) Chauvelin was still absolutely helpless, far more so than he could even have been under a blow from the fist, for now he could neither see, nor hear, nor speak, whilst his Cunning adversary had quietly slipped through his fingers.
10) All the roads patrolled and watched, the trap well set, the net, wide at present, but drawing together tighter and tighter, until it closed upon the daring plotter, whose superhuman Cunning even could not rescue him from its meshes now.
11) But Mr Bumble was Cunning enough; and he at once saw that an opportunity was opened, for the lucrative disposal of some secret in the possession of his better half.
12) He’s as Cunning as hell
13) But the heavy lock and massive iron bands baffled both his Cunning and his immense strength, so that he was compelled to bury the chest without having his curiosity satisfied.
14) And serve yer right for being a fool.’ ‘I know I ain’t as Cunning as you are,sreplied Charlotte; ‘but don’t put all the blame on me, and say I should have been locked up.
15) Armand, according to Chauvelin’s pledged word would be restored to her, but her husband, Percy, whom with every breath she drew she seemed to love and worship more and more, he would fall into the hands of a remorseless enemy, who had no pity for a brave heart, no admiration for the courage of a noble soul, who would show nothing but hatred for the Cunning antagonist, who had baffled him so long.
16) That which inspires respect in woman, and often enough fear also, is her NATURE, which is more naturalsthan that of man, her genuine, carnivoralike, Cunning flexibility, her tiger-claws beneath the glove, her NAIVETE in egoism, her untrainableness and innate wildness, the incomprehensibleness, extent, and deviation of her desires and virtues.
17) Armand, according to Chauvelin’s pledged word would be restored to her, but her husband, Percy, whom with every breath she drew she seemed to love and worship more and more, he would fall into the hands of a remorseless enemy, who had no pity for a brave heart, no admiration for the courage of a noble soul, who would show nothing but hatred for the Cunning antagonist, who had baffled him so long.
18) She felt neither soreness nor weariness; indomitable will to reach her husband in spite of adverse Fate, and of a Cunning enemy, killed all sense of bodily pain within her, and rendered her instincts doubly acute.
19) He was on his way, somewhere on this lonely road, and presently he would join them; then the well-laid trap would close, two dozen men, led by one whose hatred was as deadly as his Cunning was malicious, would close round the small band of fugitives, and their daring leader.
20) The Cunning intelligence, the piercing danger
21) Evidently the slumberer, deep in dreamless sleep, would not interfere with Chauvelin’s trap for catching that Cunning Scarlet Pimpernel.
22) Chauvelin had been too intent on listening to the sound of those approaching footsteps, to notice what his Cunning adversary had been doing.
23) He will not refuse to take you with him, perhaps, when he starts on his noble work; between you, you will have Cunning as well as valour!
24) If, like Fielding, you see virtue both as spontaneous and as in fairly short supply in the world, this means that the good will find themselves under constant siege without being furnished with the Cunning and vigilance they need to cope with these onslaughts.
25) Oh! yer a Cunning old codger!’
26) He, above all, longed to have the Cunning enemy, who had so long baffled him, helpless in his power; he wished to gloat over him, to enjoy his downfall, to inflict upon him what moral and mental torture a deadly hatred alone can devise.
27) THAT was due to the folly of Robert, and the Cunning of his wife; and it was earned by them before many months had passed away.
28) Oh! yer a Cunning old codger!’
29) A dept as she was, in all the arts of Cunning and dissimulation, the girl Nancy could not wholly conceal the effect which the knowledge of the step she had taken, wrought upon her mind.
30) He, above all, longed to have the Cunning enemy, who had so long baffled him, helpless in his power; he wished to gloat over him, to enjoy his downfall, to inflict upon him what moral and mental torture a deadly hatred alone can devise.