en-en

Cunning

adverb

1) Knowing; skillful; dexterous.

2) Wrought with, or exhibiting, skill or ingenuity; ingenious; curious; as, cunning work.

3) Crafty; sly; artful; designing; deceitful.

4) Pretty or pleasing; as, a cunning little boy.

5) Knowledge; art; skill; dexterity.

6) The faculty or act of using stratagem to accomplish a purpose; fraudulent skill or dexterity; deceit; craft.

Example Sentences for

Cunning

1) Where­ 16 SOCIAL PROTEST as Innocence, having no such Purpose, walks fearlessly and care­ lessly through Life; and is consequently liable to tread on the Gins, which Cunning hath laid to entrap it. . . . it is not Want of Sense, but Want of Suspicion by which Innocence is often betrayed. . . . many an innocent Person hath owed his Ruin to this Circumstance alone, that the Degree of Villainy was such as must have exceeded the Faith of every Man who was not himself a Villain.7 That Fielding largely avoids satire in Amelia makes his criticism relatively straightforward, without a stylistic intermediary be­ tween the author's voice and the reader.
2) She had heard Desgas giving orders to his men, and then starting off towards the fort, to get a reinforcement of a dozen more men: six were not thought sufficient to capture the Cunning Englishman, whose resourceful brain was even more dangerous than his valour and his strength.
3) But Mr Bumble was Cunning enough; and he at once saw that an opportunity was opened, for the lucrative disposal of some secret in the possession of his better half.
4) But Mr Bumble was Cunning enough; and he at once saw that an opportunity was opened, for the lucrative disposal of some secret in the possession of his better half.
5) History, like art, forges something new out of a Cunning recycling of the old.
6) It all looked so peaceful, so luxurious, and so still, that the keenest observer—a veritable prophet—could never have guessed that, at this present moment, that deserted supper-room was nothing but a trap laid for the capture of the most Cunning and audacious plotter those stirring times had ever seen.
7) All the roads patrolled and watched, the trap well set, the net, wide at present, but drawing together tighter and tighter, until it closed upon the daring plotter, whose superhuman Cunning even could not rescue him from its meshes now.
8) Oh! yer a Cunning old codger!’
9) Whereas Innocence, having no such Purpose, walks fearlessly and carelessly through Life; and is consequently liable to tread on the Gins, which Cunning hath laid to entrap it.
10) THAT was due to the folly of Robert, and the Cunning of his wife; and it was earned by them before many months had passed away.
11) Whereas Innocence, having no such Purpose, walks fearlessly and carelessly through Life; and is consequently liable to tread on the Gins, which Cunning hath laid to entrap it.
12) What has procured me the honour of being followed across the Channel by so charming a companion, I cannot, of course, conceive, but, if I mistake it not, the purpose of this flattering attention is not one that would commend itself to my vanity and I think that I am right in surmising, moreover, that the first sound which your pretty lips would utter, as 308 The Scarlet Pimpernel soon as the cruel gag is removed, would be one that would prove a warning to the Cunning fox, which I have been at such pains to track to his lair.’
13) How can we teach our children otherwise, Rachael? We are a lethal species, with Cunning and intelligence and gifts beyond the ordinary, but we also have the mood swings and temperaments of our animal cousins and that makes us far too dangerous without laws to guide us
14) They never turn aside and they’re as Cunning as hell
15) The event has proved, that I was a Cunning fool, providing with great circumspection for a possible opportunity of making myself contemptible and wretched for ever.
16) Where­ 16 SOCIAL PROTEST as Innocence, having no such Purpose, walks fearlessly and care­ lessly through Life; and is consequently liable to tread on the Gins, which Cunning hath laid to entrap it. . . . it is not Want of Sense, but Want of Suspicion by which Innocence is often betrayed. . . . many an innocent Person hath owed his Ruin to this Circumstance alone, that the Degree of Villainy was such as must have exceeded the Faith of every Man who was not himself a Villain.7 That Fielding largely avoids satire in Amelia makes his criticism relatively straightforward, without a stylistic intermediary be­ tween the author's voice and the reader.
17) Not a loophole was left, through which the bravest, the most Cunning man might escape.
18) But so far the young Englishman had been able to keep those horrible fangs from his jugular and now, as they fought less fiercely for a moment, to regain their breath, Tarzan formed a Cunning plan.
19) He, above all, longed to have the Cunning enemy, who had so long baffled him, helpless in his power; he wished to gloat over him, to enjoy his downfall, to inflict upon him what moral and mental torture a deadly hatred alone can devise.
20) A dept as she was, in all the arts of Cunning and dissimulation, the girl Nancy could not wholly conceal the effect which the knowledge of the step she had taken, wrought upon her mind.
21) Armand, according to Chauvelin’s pledged word would be restored to her, but her husband, Percy, whom with every breath she drew she seemed to love and worship more and more, he would fall into the hands of a remorseless enemy, who had no pity for a brave heart, no admiration for the courage of a noble soul, who would show nothing but hatred for the Cunning antagonist, who had baffled him so long.
22) If, like Fielding, you see virtue both as spontaneous and as in fairly short supply in the world, this means that the good will find themselves under constant siege without being furnished with the Cunning and vigilance they need to cope with these onslaughts.
23) He, above all, longed to have the Cunning enemy, who had so long baffled him, helpless in his power; he wished to gloat over him, to enjoy his downfall, to inflict upon him what moral and mental torture a deadly hatred alone can devise.
24) That which inspires respect in woman, and often enough fear also, is her NATURE, which is more naturalsthan that of man, her genuine, carnivoralike, Cunning flexibility, her tiger-claws beneath the glove, her NAIVETE in egoism, her untrainableness and innate wildness, the incomprehensibleness, extent, and deviation of her desires and virtues.
25) The plot focuses on a brutal and Cunning group of recently escaped replicants hiding in Los Angeles and the burnt out expert blade runner , Rick Deckard , who reluctantly agrees to take on one more assignment to hunt them down
26) My mother found it, after a year of Cunning search—ay, and found the child.’ ‘She took it, did she?’ ‘No.
27) Through the Cunning of their ambitious prefect , Sejanus , the Guard was brought from their Italian barracks into Rome itself
28) Even this, however, can be a mask for self-interest: St George, the successful novelist of The Lesson of the Master’, urges the aspiring author Paul Overt to abandon all worldly preoccupations; but we cannot be sure that this is not just a Cunning device to separate him from the woman he loves, who St George then proceeds to marry himself.
29) But the heavy lock and massive iron bands baffled both his Cunning and his immense strength, so that he was compelled to bury the chest without having his curiosity satisfied.
30) That which inspires respect in woman, and often enough fear also, is her NATURE, which is more naturalsthan that of man, her genuine, carnivoralike, Cunning flexibility, her tiger-claws beneath the glove, her NAIVETE in egoism, her untrainableness and innate wildness, the incomprehensibleness, extent, and deviation of her desires and virtues.