en-en

Defiance

noun

1) The act of defying, putting in opposition, or provoking to combat; a challenge; a provocation; a summons to combat.

2) A state of opposition; willingness to flight; disposition to resist; contempt of opposition.

3) A casting aside; renunciation; rejection.

Example Sentences for

Defiance

1) We know not if he be tall or short, fair or dark, handsome or ill-formed; but we know that he is the bravest gentleman in all the world, and we all feel a little proud, Monsieur, when we remember that he is an Englishman. ‘Ah, Monsieur Chauvelin,sadded Marguerite, looking almost with Defiance across at the placid, sphinx-like face of the Frenchman, His Royal Highness should add that we ladies think of him as of a hero of old…we worship him…we wear his badge…we tremble for him when he is in danger, and exult with him in the hour of his victory.’
2) She is pertsand devious, with a quick strategic eye to her own interests; but her saucesand impudence are among other things a spirited Defiance of upper-class authority.
3) She stared at me with a mixture of Defiance and resignation.
4) There was Defiance in her voice
5) The pupil reasserted itself quickly, this halfdisclosed nature fell again under the reign of prudence, and her astrakhan jacket, moulding a bosom of a certain fullness, struck the note of Defiance more definitely.
6) Led by a charismatic Friends of SNCC student activist named Mario Savio , upwards of three thousand students surrounded a police car in which a student , arrested for setting up a card table in Defiance of a ban by the University , was being taken away
7) Since Descartesó and indeed more in Defiance of him than on the basis of his procedureóan ATTENTAT has been made on the part of all philosophers on the old conception of the soul, under the guise of a criticism of the subject and predicate conceptionóthat is to say, an ATTENTAT on the fundamental presupposition of Christian doctrine.
8) In the next cell was another man, who was going to the same prison for hawking tin saucepans without license; thereby doing something for his living, in Defiance of the Stamp-office.
9) She is pertsand devious, with a quick strategic eye to her own interests; but her saucesand impudence are among other things a spirited Defiance of upper-class authority.
10) We know not if he be tall or short, fair or dark, handsome or ill-formed; but we know that he is the bravest gentleman in all the world, and we all feel a little proud, Monsieur, when we remember that he is an Englishman. ‘Ah, Monsieur Chauvelin,sadded Marguerite, looking almost with Defiance across at the placid, sphinx-like face of the Frenchman, His Royal Highness should add that we ladies think of him as of a hero of old…we worship him…we wear his badge…we tremble for him when he is in danger, and exult with him in the hour of his victory.’
11) Ah! but I think you will obey,’ he added, with that funny dry chuckle of his as Marguerite’s whole figure seemed to stiffen, in Defiance of this order, ‘for let me tell you that if you scream, nay! if you utter one sound, or attempt to move from here, my men—there are thirty of them about—will seize St.
12) Since Descartesó and indeed more in Defiance of him than on the basis of his procedureóan ATTENTAT has been made on the part of all philosophers on the old conception of the soul, under the guise of a criticism of the subject and predicate conceptionóthat is to say, an ATTENTAT on the fundamental presupposition of Christian doctrine.
13) Eh?’ ‘Not one,sreplied Master Bates, in a voice rendered husky by regret; not one.’ ‘Then what do you talk of?sreplied Fagin angrily; what are you blubbering for?’ ‘’Cause it isn’t on the rec-ord, is it?ssaid Charley, chafed into perfect Defiance of his venerable friend by the current of his regrets; ’cause it can’t come out in the dictment; ‘cause nobody will never know half of what he was.
14) Eh?’ ‘Not one,sreplied Master Bates, in a voice rendered husky by regret; not one.’ ‘Then what do you talk of?sreplied Fagin angrily; what are you blubbering for?’ ‘’Cause it isn’t on the rec-ord, is it?ssaid Charley, chafed into perfect Defiance of his venerable friend by the current of his regrets; ’cause it can’t come out in the dictment; ‘cause nobody will never know half of what he was.
15) In the next cell was another man, who was going to the same prison for hawking tin saucepans without license; thereby doing something for his living, in Defiance of the Stamp-office.
16) I am very glad you have changed it—very—very.’ ‘This is all mighty fine,ssaid Monks (to retain his assumed designation) after a long silence, during which he had jerked himself in sullen Defiance to and fro, and Mr Brownlow had sat, shading his face with his hand.
17) Ah! but I think you will obey,’ he added, with that funny dry chuckle of his as Marguerite’s whole figure seemed to stiffen, in Defiance of this order, ‘for let me tell you that if you scream, nay! if you utter one sound, or attempt to move from here, my men—there are thirty of them about—will seize St.
18) She stared at me with a mixture of Defiance and resignation.
19) The pupil reasserted itself quickly, this halfdisclosed nature fell again under the reign of prudence, and her astrakhan jacket, moulding a bosom of a certain fullness, struck the note of Defiance more definitely.
20) I am very glad you have changed it—very—very.’ ‘This is all mighty fine,ssaid Monks (to retain his assumed designation) after a long silence, during which he had jerked himself in sullen Defiance to and fro, and Mr Brownlow had sat, shading his face with his hand.
21) 1930 - Mahatma Gandhi leads a 200-mile march known as Dandi March to the sea in Defiance of British opposition , to protest the British monopoly on salt