en-en

Offend

v. t.

1) To strike against; to attack; to assail.

2) To displease; to make angry; to affront.

3) To be offensive to; to harm; to pain; to annoy; as, strong light offends the eye; to offend the conscience.

4) To transgress; to violate; to sin against.

5) To oppose or obstruct in duty; to cause to stumble; to cause to sin or to fall.

Example Sentences for

Offend

1) This delay on the Colonel’s side, however, did not seem to Offend or mortify his fair companion in the least, for on their breaking up the conference soon afterwards, and moving different ways, Mrs Jennings very plainly heard Elinor say, and with a voice which shewed her to feel what she said, ‘I shall always think myself very much obliged to you.’
2) I wondered if I had said anything to Offend him. ‘He becomes very sentimental sometimes,sexplained Gatsby.
3) But I was willing to shew you that I had not forgot our old disputes.’ ‘I love to be reminded of the past, Edward—whether it be melancholy or gay, I love to recall it—and you will never Offend me by talking of former times.
4) This delay on the Colonel’s side, however, did not seem to Offend or mortify his fair companion in the least, for on their breaking up the conference soon afterwards, and moving different ways, Mrs Jennings very plainly heard Elinor say, and with a voice which shewed her to feel what she said, ‘I shall always think myself very much obliged to you.’
5) But I was willing to shew you that I had not forgot our old disputes.’ ‘I love to be reminded of the past, Edward—whether it be melancholy or gay, I love to recall it—and you will never Offend me by talking of former times.
6) This was a subject which ensured Marianne’s attention, and she was beginning to describe her own admiration of these scenes, and to question him more minutely on the objects that had particularly struck him, when Edward interrupted her by saying, You must not enquire too far, Marianne—remember I have no knowledge in the picturesque, and I shall Offend you by my ignorance and want of taste if we come to particulars.
7) “Is there a baby on the way here?” the lawyer asked him cautiously, not wanting to Offend him, but he thought he should know.
8) Alice did not wish to Offend the Dormouse again, so she began very cautiously: But I don’t understand.
9) Alice did not wish to Offend the Dormouse again, so she began very cautiously: But I don’t understand.
10) I hope my aversion to religion won’t Offend you.
11) This was a subject which ensured Marianne’s attention, and she was beginning to describe her own admiration of these scenes, and to question him more minutely on the objects that had particularly struck him, when Edward interrupted her by saying, You must not enquire too far, Marianne—remember I have no knowledge in the picturesque, and I shall Offend you by my ignorance and want of taste if we come to particulars.
12) I wondered if I had said anything to Offend him. ‘He becomes very sentimental sometimes,sexplained Gatsby.
13) “Is there a baby on the way here?” the lawyer asked him cautiously, not wanting to Offend him, but he thought he should know.
14) I hope my aversion to religion won’t Offend you.