en-en

Oppose

noun

1) To place in front of, or over against; to set opposite; to exhibit.

2) To put in opposition, with a view to counterbalance or countervail; to set against; to offer antagonistically.

3) To resist or antagonize by physical means, or by arguments, etc.; to contend against; to confront; to resist; to withstand; as, to oppose the king in battle; to oppose a bill in Congress.

4) To compete with; to strive against; as, to oppose a rival for a prize.

v. i.

1) To be set opposite.

2) To act adversely or in opposition; -- with against or to; as, a servant opposed against the act.

3) To make objection or opposition in controversy.

Example Sentences for

Oppose

1) To Oppose the repressive puritanism of Catholic Ireland, he drew on a carnivalesque celebration of the body which was, ironically, very much part of Irish popular culture.
2) On THAT head, therefore, it was not for her to Oppose her mother’s intention of removing into Devonshire.
3) Elinor would not Oppose his opinion, because, whatever might be her general estimation of the advantage of a public school, she could not think of Edward’s abode in Mr Pratt’s family, with any satisfaction. ‘You reside in Devonshire, I think,’—was his next observation, in a cottage near Dawlish.’
4) Women should not Oppose their petty wills to men’s noble schemes, just as they should not reap active enjoyment from sex.
5) This restriction, of course, did not apply to her, and Frank would, of course, not dare to Oppose her.
6) Two of the most outspoken critics of the guild system were Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Smith , and all over Europe a tendency to Oppose government control over trades in favor of laissez-faire free market systems was growing rapidly and making its way into the political and legal system
7) A comparable U.S. `` Century Series ' fighter was the F-100 Super Sabre , although it would primarily Oppose the more modern F-4 Phantom II and F-105 Thunderchief over North Vietnam
8) I have no doubt that every noble woman will Oppose what Dante and Goethe believed about womanóthe former when he sang, ELLA GUARDAVA SUSO, ED IO IN LEI,í and the latter when he interpreted it, the eternally feminine draws us ALOFTî; for THIS is just what she believes of the eternally masculine. 237.
9) Anti-globalization is used for people and groups who Oppose certain aspects of globalization in its present form
10) Her insipidity was invariable, for even her spirits were always the same; and though she did not Oppose the parties arranged by her husband, provided every thing were conducted in style and her two eldest children attended her, she never appeared to receive more enjoyment from them than she might have experienced in sitting at home;— and so little did her presence add to the pleasure of the others, by any share in their conversation, that they were sometimes only reminded of her being amongst them by her solicitude about her troublesome boys.
11) They were believed to Oppose free trade and hinder technological innovation , technology transfer and business development
12) They spared the children and those of the women whom they were not forced to kill in self-defense, but when at length they stopped, parting, blood covered and sweating, it was because there lived to Oppose them no single warrior of all the savage village of Mbonga.
13) Elinor would not Oppose his opinion, because, whatever might be her general estimation of the advantage of a public school, she could not think of Edward’s abode in Mr Pratt’s family, with any satisfaction. ‘You reside in Devonshire, I think,’—was his next observation, in a cottage near Dawlish.’
14) Women should not Oppose their petty wills to men’s noble schemes, just as they should not reap active enjoyment from sex.
15) This restriction, of course, did not apply to her, and Frank would, of course, not dare to Oppose her.
16) On THAT head, therefore, it was not for her to Oppose her mother’s intention of removing into Devonshire.
17) The less creditable aspect of Dickens’s Romantic humanism is unwittingly exposed by Hard Times itself, a novel which recognizes that what is at stake is a whole industrial-capitalist system, yet which can find little to Oppose to it but the anarchic spontaneity of a circus.
18) Now, the fact was, that in the inmost recesses of his own heart, Mr Grimwig was strongly disposed to admit that Oliver’s appearance and manner were unusually prepossessing; but he had a strong appetite for contradiction, sharpened on this occasion by the finding of the orangepeel; and, inwardly determining that no man should dictate to him whether a boy was well-looking or not, he had resolved, from the first, to Oppose his friend.
19) Her insipidity was invariable, for even her spirits were always the same; and though she did not Oppose the parties arranged by her husband, provided every thing were conducted in style and her two eldest children attended her, she never appeared to receive more enjoyment from them than she might have experienced in sitting at home;— and so little did her presence add to the pleasure of the others, by any share in their conversation, that they were sometimes only reminded of her being amongst them by her solicitude about her troublesome boys.
20) Now, the fact was, that in the inmost recesses of his own heart, Mr Grimwig was strongly disposed to admit that Oliver’s appearance and manner were unusually prepossessing; but he had a strong appetite for contradiction, sharpened on this occasion by the finding of the orangepeel; and, inwardly determining that no man should dictate to him whether a boy was well-looking or not, he had resolved, from the first, to Oppose his friend.
21) I have no doubt that every noble woman will Oppose what Dante and Goethe believed about womanóthe former when he sang, ELLA GUARDAVA SUSO, ED IO IN LEI,í and the latter when he interpreted it, the eternally feminine draws us ALOFTî; for THIS is just what she believes of the eternally masculine. 237.
22) The less creditable aspect of Dickens’s Romantic humanism is unwittingly exposed by Hard Times itself, a novel which recognizes that what is at stake is a whole industrial-capitalist system, yet which can find little to Oppose to it but the anarchic spontaneity of a circus.
23) To Oppose the repressive puritanism of Catholic Ireland, he drew on a carnivalesque celebration of the body which was, ironically, very much part of Irish popular culture.
24) They spared the children and those of the women whom they were not forced to kill in self-defense, but when at length they stopped, parting, blood covered and sweating, it was because there lived to Oppose them no single warrior of all the savage village of Mbonga.