en-en

Preferment

noun

1) The act of choosing, or the state of being chosen; preference.

2) The act of preferring, or advancing in dignity or office; the state of being advanced; promotion.

3) A position or office of honor or profit; as, the preferments of the church.

Example Sentences for

Preferment

1) While Hugh is still writing his antigovernment tracts, Idford already has gained Preferment from the incumbent prime minister and become a party man.
2) He finds, therefore, that the incumbent government can offer him an office and is like many of his predecessors, instantly illumined, and [feels] the error of his former perceptions.1 But he does not get the Preferment he wants, and he reverts to the opposition, finally managing to barter his boroughs for a title and become Lord Grondale.2 Principle plays no part in any of these dealings.
3) I p 108) Dr Blick, on the other hand, has furnished himself with a prudent quantity of adulation, which 208 SOCIAL PROTEST has answered his purpose well; he has church Preferment to near 1000£. per annum (vol.
4) While Hugh is still writing his antigovernment tracts, Idford already has gained Preferment from the incumbent prime minister and become a party man.
5) He finds, therefore, that the incumbent government can offer him an office and is like many of his predecessors, instantly illumined, and [feels] the error of his former perceptions.1 But he does not get the Preferment he wants, and he reverts to the opposition, finally managing to barter his boroughs for a title and become Lord Grondale.2 Principle plays no part in any of these dealings.
6) I p 108) Dr Blick, on the other hand, has furnished himself with a prudent quantity of adulation, which 208 SOCIAL PROTEST has answered his purpose well; he has church Preferment to near 1000£. per annum (vol.
7) The Preferment seemed to him in the nature of a well-merited reward for painstaking and intelligent service, and as a stepping stone to posts of greater importance and responsibility; but, on the other hand, he had been married to the Hon.
8) The Preferment seemed to him in the nature of a well-merited reward for painstaking and intelligent service, and as a stepping stone to posts of greater importance and responsibility; but, on the other hand, he had been married to the Hon.
9) IV, pp. 126-27) For the doctor, the relation between the individual and society as a whole is very close indeed: to deny a Man the Preferment which he merits, and to give it to another Man who doth not merit it, is a manifest Act of In­ justice. . . .
10) IV, pp. 126-27) For the doctor, the relation between the individual and society as a whole is very close indeed: to deny a Man the Preferment which he merits, and to give it to another Man who doth not merit it, is a manifest Act of In­ justice. . . .