en-en

Sake

noun

1) Final cause; end; purpose of obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest; concern; account; regard or respect; -- used chiefly in such phrases as, for the sake of, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and the like; as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for the sake of one's health.

Example Sentences for

Sake

1) Many comedians , writers and others rely on the buttocks in these and other ways -LRB- such as flatulence and toilet humor -RRB- as a source of amusement , camaraderie and fun , despite -LRB- or in some cases for the Sake of -RRB- the risk of being in dubious taste , if not censored
2) And since it is knowledge for its own Sake – knowledge which is in a sense entirely useless – it can offer an alternative to the pressing of knowledge into the service of power.
3) Perhaps the paradox of his situation becomes so dreadful that, precisely where he has learnt GREAT SYMPATHY, together with great CONTEMPT, the multitude, the educated, and the visionaries, have on their part learnt great reverenceóreverence for ëgreat mensand marvelous animals, for the Sake of whom one blesses and honours the fatherland, the earth, the dignity of mankind, and oneís own self, to whom one points the young, and in view of whom one educates them.
4) Nostromo is there for the Sake of his public image, Decoud for the Sake of his beloved Antonia, and Hirsch is fleeing for his life.
5) As soon as they returned to the carriage, Mrs Jennings was eager for information; but as Elinor wished to spread as 328 Sense and Sensibility little as possible intelligence that had in the first place been so unfairly obtained, she confined herself to the brief repetition of such simple particulars, as she felt assured that Lucy, for the Sake of her own consequence, would choose to have known.
6) And with regard to Aristophanesóthat transfiguring, complementary genius, for whose Sake one PARDONS all Hellenism for having existed, provided one has understood in its full profundity ALL that there requires pardon and transfiguration; there is nothing that has caused me to meditate more on PLATOíS secrecy and sphinx-like nature, than the happily preserved petit fait that under the pillow of his death-bed there was found no Bible,snor anything Egyptian, Pythagorean, or Platonicóbut a book of Aristophanes.
7) For the Sake of dignity, I waited until last.
8) He bent forward to kiss them, for they peeped out through her torn stockings, and bore pathetic witness to her endurance and devotion. ‘But Armand…sshe said with sudden terror and remorse, as in the midst of her happiness the image of the beloved brother, for whose Sake she had so deeply sinned, rose now before her mind. ‘Oh! have no fear for Armand, sweetheart,she said ten334 The Scarlet Pimpernel derly, did I not pledge you my word that he should be safe?
9) A delight in language for its own Sake means a rejection of it as a blunt instrument of power.
10) She spike quite calmly, even cheerfully now, thinking out her plans, ready for the worst if need be; she would show no more weakness, she would prove herself worthy of him, who was about to give his life for the Sake of his fellow-men.
11) But a blight had come over my existence, and I only visited these people for the Sake of the information they might give me on the subject in which my interest was so terribly profound.
12) And his admission of guilt to Ashley, even minimally for the Sake of honesty with her, hadn’t served him well.
13) Even an action for loveís Sake shall be unegoisticí?
14) Nostromo is there for the Sake of his public image, Decoud for the Sake of his beloved Antonia, and Hirsch is fleeing for his life.
15) She doubted the sincerity of this assurance no more than he had doubted it himself, and she thought of it for her daughters’ Sake with satisfaction, though as for herself she was persuaded that a much smaller provision than 7000L would support her in affluence.
16) I only hope, for the Sake of the rising male sex generally, that you may be found in as vulnerable and soft-hearted a mood by the first eligible young fellow who appeals to your compassion; and I wish I were a young fellow, that I might avail myself, on the spot, of such a favourable opportunity for doing so, as the present.’ ‘You are as great a boy as poor Brittles himself,sreturned Rose, blushing. ‘Well,ssaid the doctor, laughing heartily, that is no very difficult matter.
17) Only then does he feel the beloved one fully in his possession, when she no longer deceives herself about him, when she loves him just as much for the Sake of his devilry and concealed insatiability, as for his goodness, patience, and spirituality.
18) Mrs Wollstonecraft has presumed to say . . . that the homage men pay to youth and beauty is insidious; that women for the Sake of this . . . permit themselves . . . to submit to this inferiority of character. . . .
19) He repeated the inquiry with yet greater eagerness. ‘For God’s Sake tell me, is she out of danger, or is she not?’ ‘We hope she is.’
20) Perhaps the paradox of his situation becomes so dreadful that, precisely where he has learnt GREAT SYMPATHY, together with great CONTEMPT, the multitude, the educated, and the visionaries, have on their part learnt great reverenceóreverence for ëgreat mensand marvelous animals, for the Sake of whom one blesses and honours the fatherland, the earth, the dignity of mankind, and oneís own self, to whom one points the young, and in view of whom one educates them.
21) The idle, rich man wanted some aim in life—he, and the few young bucks he enrolled under his banner, had amused themselves for months in risking their lives for the Sake of an innocent few.
22) Fate HAD decided, had made her speak, had made her do a vile and abominable thing, for the Sake of the brother she loved.
23) It is secretly indulged in for its own Sake – even though, for a puritan like Defoe, this is as morally indefensible as selfpleasuring sex as opposed to the reproductive variety.
24) This is why Defoe has to insist that the story exists for the Sake of the moral, even though it is farcically obvious that it does not.
25) Tell me, Willoughby; for heaven’s Sake tell me, what is the matter?’
26) Just as you can collect as an end in itself, so there is a sense in which an artist pursues his or her craft simply for the Sake of it.
27) Sure somebody else might be found that would do as well; somebody that is in orders already.’ ‘My dear ma’am,ssaid Elinor, what can you be thinking of?— Why, Colonel Brandon’s only object is to be of use to Mr Ferrars.’ ‘Lord bless you, my dear!—Sure you do not mean to persuade me that the Colonel only marries you for the Sake of giving ten guineas to Mr Ferrars!’
28) If any being felt emotions of benevolence towards me, I should return them a hundred and a hundredfold; for that one creature’s Sake I would make peace with the whole kind!
29) But if there should by any chance happen to be a woman who is single at seven and twenty, I should not think Colonel Brandon’s being thirty-five any objection to his marrying HER.’ ‘A woman of seven and twenty,ssaid Marianne, after pausing a moment, can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the Sake of the provision and security of a wife.
30) They were spontaneous semioticians, who needed for their own Sake to be skilled in deciphering signs of power, symptoms of dissent, and fruitful or dangerous areas of ambiguity.