en-en

Sake

noun

1) Final cause; end; purpose of obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest; concern; account; regard or respect; -- used chiefly in such phrases as, for the sake of, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and the like; as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for the sake of one's health.

Example Sentences for

Sake

1) Perhaps the paradox of his situation becomes so dreadful that, precisely where he has learnt GREAT SYMPATHY, together with great CONTEMPT, the multitude, the educated, and the visionaries, have on their part learnt great reverenceóreverence for ëgreat mensand marvelous animals, for the Sake of whom one blesses and honours the fatherland, the earth, the dignity of mankind, and oneís own self, to whom one points the young, and in view of whom one educates them.
2) What she would engage to do towards augmenting their income was next to be considered; and here it plainly appeared, that though Edward was now her only son, he was by no means her eldest; for while Robert was inevitably endowed with a thousand pounds a year, not the smallest objection was made against Edward’s taking orders for the Sake of two hundred and fifty at the utmost; nor was anything promised either for the present or in future, beyond the ten thousand pounds, which had been given with Fanny.
3) She knew that Chauvelin would willingly have braved perilous encounters for the Sake of the cause he had at heart, but what he did fear was that this impudent Englishman would, by knocking him down, double his own chances of escape; his underlings might not succeed so sell in capturing the Scarlet Pimpernel, when not directed by the cunning hand and the shrewd brain, which had deadly hate for an incentive.
4) And his admission of guilt to Ashley, even minimally for the Sake of honesty with her, hadn’t served him well.
5) And for your Sake and the planet's please dare to be playful too.
6) This is why Defoe has to insist that the story exists for the Sake of the moral, even though it is farcically obvious that it does not.
7) For her Sake he would have refused the appointment, but she would not have it so.
8) Crusoe works a lot of the time for the Sake of working, as capitalists accumulate for the Sake of accumulation.
9) I only hope, for the Sake of the rising male sex generally, that you may be found in as vulnerable and soft-hearted a mood by the first eligible young fellow who appeals to your compassion; and I wish I were a young fellow, that I might avail myself, on the spot, of such a favourable opportunity for doing so, as the present.’ ‘You are as great a boy as poor Brittles himself,sreturned Rose, blushing. ‘Well,ssaid the doctor, laughing heartily, that is no very difficult matter.
10) A delight in language for its own Sake means a rejection of it as a blunt instrument of power.
11) Who has not, at one time or anotherósacrificed himself for the Sake of his good name? 93.
12) But Elinor had more to do; and so anxious was she, for his Sake and her own, to do it well, that she forced herself, after a moment’s recollection, to welcome him, with a look 288 Sense and Sensibility and manner that were almost easy, and almost open; and another struggle, another effort still improved them.
13) It is secretly indulged in for its own Sake – even though, for a puritan like Defoe, this is as morally indefensible as selfpleasuring sex as opposed to the reproductive variety.
14) And with regard to Aristophanesóthat transfiguring, complementary genius, for whose Sake one PARDONS all Hellenism for having existed, provided one has understood in its full profundity ALL that there requires pardon and transfiguration; there is nothing that has caused me to meditate more on PLATOíS secrecy and sphinx-like nature, than the happily preserved petit fait that under the pillow of his death-bed there was found no Bible,snor anything Egyptian, Pythagorean, or Platonicóbut a book of Aristophanes.
15) Where in the world am I to look for him?’ ‘You go everywhere, citoyenne,swhispered Chauvelin, insinuatingly, Lady Blakeney is the pivot of social London, so I am told…you see everything, you HEAR everything.’ ‘Easy, my friend,sretorted Marguerite, drawing, herself up to her full height and looking down, with a slight thought of contempt on the small, thin figure before her. ‘Easy! you seem to forget that there are six feet of Sir Percy Blakeney, and a long line of ancestors to stand between Lady Blakeney and such a thing as you propose.’ ‘For the Sake of France, citoyenne!sreiterated Chauvelin, earnestly. ‘Tush, man, you talk nonsense anyway; for even if you did know who this Scarlet Pimpernel is, you could do nothing to him—an Englishman!’
16) That evening in the little waiting room at the station Tarzan caught Jane alone for a moment. ‘You are free now, Jane,she said, and I have come across the ages out of the dim and distant past from the lair of the primeval man to claim you—for your Sake I have become a civilized man—for your Sake I have crossed oceans and continents—for your Sake I will be whatever you will me to be.
17) I must feel—I must be wretched—and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can.’ ‘But for my mother’s Sake and mine—‘ ‘I would do more than for my own.
18) But in chess, just as in life, there were moves that you made for the Sake of winning and there were moves you made because they were the right thing to do.
19) They were spontaneous semioticians, who needed for their own Sake to be skilled in deciphering signs of power, symptoms of dissent, and fruitful or dangerous areas of ambiguity.
20) This court finds the defendant not guilty, and the cruiser shall wait a few days longer that he may have an opportunity to come and thank the divine Portia.’ ‘For the Lord’s Sake honey,scried Esmeralda.
21) But a blight had come over my existence, and I only visited these people for the Sake of the information they might give me on the subject in which my interest was so terribly profound.
22) I am sure— certain—quite certain—that, for your Sake, who are so good yourself; and for her own; and for the Sake of all she makes so happy; she will not die.
23) He performed these two social duties for old dignity’s Sake but conceded nothing further to the conventions which regulate the civic life.
24) A Blakeney had died on Bosworth field, another had sacrified life and fortune for the Sake of a treacherous Stuart: and that same pride—foolish and prejudiced as the republican Armand would call it—must have been stung to the quick on hearing of the sin which lay at Lady Blakeney’s 74 The Scarlet Pimpernel door.
25) Just as you can collect as an end in itself, so there is a sense in which an artist pursues his or her craft simply for the Sake of it.
26) Perhaps the paradox of his situation becomes so dreadful that, precisely where he has learnt GREAT SYMPATHY, together with great CONTEMPT, the multitude, the educated, and the visionaries, have on their part learnt great reverenceóreverence for ëgreat mensand marvelous animals, for the Sake of whom one blesses and honours the fatherland, the earth, the dignity of mankind, and oneís own self, to whom one points the young, and in view of whom one educates them.
27) Cyr, which in England no one had credited, for the Sake of Sir Percy, as well as for her own. ‘What?
28) Mr Dashwood had wished for it more for the Sake of his wife and daughters than for himself or his son;—but to his son, and his son’s son, a child of four years old, it was secured, in such a way, as to leave to himself no power of providing for those who were most dear to him, and who most needed a provision by any charge on the estate, or by any sale of its valuable woods.
29) But in chess, just as in life, there were moves that you made for the Sake of winning and there were moves you made because they were the right thing to do.
30) Even an action for loveís Sake shall be unegoisticí?