en-en

Sake

noun

1) Final cause; end; purpose of obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest; concern; account; regard or respect; -- used chiefly in such phrases as, for the sake of, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and the like; as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for the sake of one's health.

Examples Sentences for

Sake

1) A burning curiosity seized her to know him: although for months she had heard of him and had accepted his anonymity, as everyone else in society had done; but now she longed to know—quite impersonally, quite apart from Armand, and oh! quite apart from Chauvelin—only for her own Sake, for the Sake of the enthusiastic admiration she had always bestowed on his bravery and cunning.
2) Don't shoot until you're sure of your aim-if you miss you might hit a friendly. ~And fer Chris' Sake save me one!
3) Armand! for God’s Sake fire! your leader is near! he is coming! he is betrayed!
4) And since it is knowledge for its own Sake – knowledge which is in a sense entirely useless – it can offer an alternative to the pressing of knowledge into the service of power.
5) Just had married a fool for the Sake of the worldly advantages with which he might endow her.
6) In their different ways, they believe in a corporatessocial order to which individuals must sacrifice their freedom for the Sake of a deeper identity.
7) She spike quite calmly, even cheerfully now, thinking out her plans, ready for the worst if need be; she would show no more weakness, she would prove herself worthy of him, who was about to give his life for the Sake of his fellow-men.
8) This court finds the defendant not guilty, and the cruiser shall wait a few days longer that he may have an opportunity to come and thank the divine Portia.’ ‘For the Lord’s Sake honey,scried Esmeralda.
9) The martyrdom of the philosopher, his sacrifice for the Sake of truth,sforces into the light whatever of the agitator and actor lurks in him; and if one has hitherto contemplated him only with artistic curiosity, with regard to many a philosopher it is easy to understand the dangerous desire to see him also in his deterioration (deteriorated into a martyr,í into a stage-and- tribune-bawler).
10) He’d have been in the way.’ ‘That’s right,srejoined Nancy. ‘So you’ve got the kid,ssaid Sikes when they had all reached the room: closing the door as he spoke. ‘Yes, here he is,sreplied Nancy. ‘Did he come quiet?sinquired Sikes. ‘Like a lamb,srejoined Nancy. ‘I m glad to hear it,ssaid Sikes, looking grimly at Oliver; 234 Oliver Twist ‘for the Sake of his young carcase: as would otherways have suffered for it.
11) And what does talking ever do you know?’ ‘In this affair it can only do harm; more so perhaps than in many cases of a similar kind, for it has been attended by circumstances which, for the Sake of every one concerned in it, make it unfit to become the public conversation.
12) Who has not, at one time or anotherósacrificed himself for the Sake of his good name? 93.
13) She gave way to such great grief, that Oliver, suppressing his own emotion, ventured to remonstrate with her; and to beg, earnestly, that, for the Sake of the dear young lady herself, she would be more calm. ‘And consider, ma’am,ssaid Oliver, as the tears forced themselves into his eyes, despite of his efforts to the contrary. 376 Oliver Twist ‘Oh! consider how young and good she is, and what pleasure and comfort she gives to all about her.
14) Each person must be en­ couraged to develop to his greatest potential, for his own Sake but, still more, for the Sake of that whole of which he is a part.
15) She lay there moaning, bruised, not caring, but still half-sobbing, half-shrieking,— ‘Percy, my husband, for God’s Sake fly!
16) I am sure— certain—quite certain—that, for your Sake, who are so good yourself; and for her own; and for the Sake of all she makes so happy; she will not die.
17) Fate HAD decided, had made her speak, had made her do a vile and abominable thing, for the Sake of the brother she loved.
18) He performed these two social duties for old dignity’s Sake but conceded nothing further to the conventions which regulate the civic life.
19) She spike quite calmly, even cheerfully now, thinking out her plans, ready for the worst if need be; she would show no more weakness, she would prove herself worthy of him, who was about to give his life for the Sake of his fellow-men.
20) Or between those impoverished peasants who can no longer support themselves because their land has been poisoned, and the giant corporations who have poisoned it for the Sake of profit.
21) They met for the Sake of eating, drinking, and laughing together, playing at cards, or consequences, or any other game that was sufficiently noisy.
22) But it was not immediately that an opportunity of doing so could be commanded, though Lucy was as well disposed as herself to take advantage of any that occurred; for the weather was not often fine enough to allow of their joining in a walk, where they might most easily separate themselves from the others; and though they met at least every other evening either at the park or cottage, and chiefly at the former, they could not be supposed to meet for the Sake of conversation.
23) But if there should by any chance happen to be a woman who is single at seven and twenty, I should not think Colonel Brandon’s being thirty-five any objection to his marrying HER.’ ‘A woman of seven and twenty,ssaid Marianne, after pausing a moment, can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the Sake of the provision and security of a wife.
24) In their different ways, they believe in a corporatessocial order to which individuals must sacrifice their freedom for the Sake of a deeper identity.
25) In ‘The Middle Years’, the ageing novelist Dencombe, who feels that life has passed him by, comes to see that living for his art has been worthwhile by the fact that an admirer is inspired to sacrifice a fortune for the Sake of it.
26) But Elinor had more to do; and so anxious was she, for his Sake and her own, to do it well, that she forced herself, after a moment’s recollection, to welcome him, with a look 288 Sense and Sensibility and manner that were almost easy, and almost open; and another struggle, another effort still improved them.
27) The `` strongest , political rationale ' for democratic schools is that they teach `` the virtues of democratic deliberation for the Sake of future citizenship
28) I only hope, for the Sake of the rising male sex generally, that you may be found in as vulnerable and soft-hearted a mood by the first eligible young fellow who appeals to your compassion; and I wish I were a young fellow, that I might avail myself, on the spot, of such a favourable opportunity for doing so, as the present.’ ‘You are as great a boy as poor Brittles himself,sreturned Rose, blushing. ‘Well,ssaid the doctor, laughing heartily, that is no very difficult matter.
29) Just as the inherent fascination of realism takes over from Defoe’s supposed moral lesson, so Moll’s crimes are perpetrated partly for their own Sake – or rather, so to speak, for ours.
30) I must feel—I must be wretched—and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can.’ ‘But for my mother’s Sake and mine—‘ ‘I would do more than for my own.